• Tim Ingold (anthropologist): The Life of Lines (2015), Being Alive: Essays on Movement, Knowledge and Description (2011); Lines: A Brief History (2007); The Perception of the Environment: Essays on Livelihood, Dwelling and Skill (2000).
  • Adam Robbert: (((Knowledge Ecology))): (((Knowledge Ecology))) is a blog maintained by Adam Robbert. All I know about Adam is that he is an independent scholar who wrote a master’s thesis whose title I very much enjoy contemplating (“Nature, media, and knowledge: A transdisciplinary study of the nature and impact of ecological research in science, culture, and philosophy”). I first became aware of Adam’s blog when following a Latour trail deep into the dense fabric of cyberspace. Once there, I stayed for quite some time and I go back regularly. Adam describes his blog this way: “The site is devoted to exploring emerging topics in continental and speculative philosophy, media ecology, cosmopolitics, art, and political ecology.” In 2013, Adam began hosting another blog, the AIME Research Group, designed to bring together a community of readers of Bruno Latour’s An Inquiry Into the Modes of Existence (2013).
  • Radhika Gorur: I first met Radhika in 2009 at an educational research conference in Vienna. I attended her paper session in which she made an approach of the well-known international educational testing giant, PISA, by means of Actor-Network Theory (or ANT). It was a fantastic presentation that lead to THIS interesting journal article. We had lunch together afterwards and had a great chat. I’ve been keeping an eye out for her scholarship ever since.
  • Actor-network theory simultaneously relies on (at least) three interrelated concepts: spacenodes, and networks. Artist Tomas Saraceno has constructed a number of different themed exhibits that help render this tripartite concept visible. For me, Saraceno has found a fresh and exciting way of expressing and presenting the realities that Latour so often describes.
  • Janet Vertesi (sociologist of science and technology): Representation in scientific practice is a long-standing interest of mine, but also of Princeton-based Janet Vertesi. In papers covering diverse and engaging topics such as the use of iconic imagery in maps of the London Underground and digital imaging technologies used on the Mars Rover mission, Vertesi’s work offers examples of contemporary research from the field of STS. Vertesi has also worked closely with two contemporaries of Bruno Latour, Michel Callon and Steve Woolgar.